Blanca's Advice: Queuing at the tennis

Blanca's Advice: Queuing at the tennis
Tags: sports | tennis | tips | wimbledon

Queuing for Tickets

Anyone willing to stand in line (or queue as we say here) can buy tickets on the day of thematches. The atmosphere in the queue is friendly and visitors enjoy the opportunity of meeting and talking tennis with other fans.

Every day, except the last four days, 500 tickets for each of the Center and No.1 and No.2 courts are reserved for sale to the public at the turnstiles. The cost varies, depending on the day and the court, from between about £43 and £225 (in 2019).

Another several thousand Grounds Admission tickets are sold every day. They're good for No. 2 court standing and unreserved seating and standing on Courts 3-19. Tickets cost between £8 and £25, depending on the day. You have to pay with cash and prices change every year so check the ticket website to be sure. 

Tickets are sold on a first come, first serve, cash only basis at the turnstiles. The ticket queue is a single line to Gate 3, starting in Wimbledon Park, parking lot 10 off Wimbledon Park Road.  From the park, the queuers (including overnight queuers) progress through Wimbledon Park golf club, through security checks, over a bridge and on to Gate 3.

The queues are long! If you want a Grounds Admission ticket, you should arrive several hours before the grounds open at 10:30 a.m. If you are angling for one of the show court tickets, plan on camping out overnight. People in the queues bring folding chairs, picnics and non-alcoholic drinks. Plan on bringing rain wear too - the lines snake along, rain or shine.

When you get in line, you'll be given a Queue Card that is dated and numbered to show your place in the queue. Hold onto it, it will be checked when you enter the grounds.

You'll also be offered wristbands marked by the court, with a detachable court tally, if you arrive early enough to score one of the 1,500 Court Tickets. When you hand it in to the cashier, you'll get a ticket for the court named on the tally. Don't worry if you don't get a wristband and tally - you might still be able to get one of the thousands of Grounds Admission tickets.

Camping in the Wimbledon queue In the past, if you wanted to get a night's sleep in the Wimbledon ticket queue, you had to take your chances and set your tent up in or near the queue. In 2008, the process became easier. Queuers can now camp in Wimbledon Park, near Parking Lot 10 where the queue begins.

At about 6 a.m. volunteer stewards will wake you up, ask you to dismantle your camping equipment, move your cars to the car parks and close up into a tighter formation to make room for those joining the queue on the day.

At 7:30a.m. the Stewards will hand out the 1,500 court-specific wristbands from the front of the queue.

Toilets Don't worry, facilities in Church Road and Wimbledon Park Road are open for 24 hours daily.

Mobility impaired visitors Mobility impaired visitors can wait nearer to the Grounds, but entry to the grounds will still be in queue card number order. Ask a steward for help and for directions to the end of the nearest queue. Disabled visitors with mobility issues who plan to buy tickets on the day of play should telephone the Ticket Office on +44 (0)20 8971 2473, for further instructions about facilities and parking.

Bus No. 493 will drop you off near the courts, there is also a frequent shuttle bus travels to the All England Lawn Tennis Club from the station, or you can walk, it is only 20 minutes. 

 

What fantastic advice! Thank you Blanca.

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